Physics I: Classical Mechanics

Course Description

8.01 is a first-semester freshman physics class in Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory. In addition to the basic concepts of Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Kinetic Gas Theory, a variety of interesting topics are covered in this course: Binary Stars, Neutron Sta... (read more)

Video Lectures

# Lecture Play Video
I. Kinematics
1 Measurements of Space and Time Play Video
2 Speed, Velocity and Acceleration Play Video
3 Vectors Play Video
4 3D Kinematics: The Motion of Projectiles Play Video
5 Circular Motion Play Video
6 Newton's Three Laws Play Video
7 Weight and Weightlessness Play Video
8 Friction Play Video
9 Exam Review Play Video
10 Hooke's Law and Simple Harmonic Motion Play Video
II. Work and Energy
11 Work and Mechanical Energy Play Video
12 Resistive Forces Play Video
13 Conservative Forces and SHO Play Video
14 Energy, Power and Satellite Orbits Play Video
III. Momentum
15 Collisions and the Center of Mass Play Video
16 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions Play Video
17 Change of Momentum, Impulse and Rockets Play Video
18 Exam Review Play Video
IV. Celestial Mechanics
19 Rotational Kinetic Energy Play Video
20 Angular Momentum Play Video
21 Torques and Oscillating Bodies Play Video
22 Kepler's Laws and Elliptical Orbits Play Video
23 Doppler Shift and Stellar Dynamics Play Video
24 Rolling Motion & Gyroscopes Play Video
V. Solid Mechanics
25 Static Equilibrium Play Video
26 Elasticity of Materials Play Video
VI. Fluid Mechanics
27 Pressure in a Static Fluid Play Video
28 Buoyant Force and Bernoulli's Equation Play Video
29 Exam Review Play Video
30 Other Oscillating Systems Play Video
31 Forced Oscillations and Resonance Play Video
VII. Thermal Physics
32 Heat, Conductivity and Thermal Expansion Play Video
33 Kinetic Gas Theory & Phases Play Video
VIII. Modern Physics
34 The Wonderful Quantum World Play Video
35 X-ray Astronomy and Astrophysics Play Video

Comments

Displaying 8 comments:

York Earwaker wrote 4 years ago.
Excellent! Power of physics married to mathematics. Or as
Feynman would have it guess implies computational
consequences (mathematical theory) is compared to experiment
(implies real world outcome).


York Earwaker wrote 4 years ago.
Excellent! Power of physics married to mathematics. Or as
Feynman would have it guess implies computational
consequences (mathematical theory) is compared to experiment
(implies real world outcome).


York Earwaker wrote 4 years ago.
Excellent! Power of physics married to mathematics. Or as
Feynman would have it guess implies computational
consequences (mathematical theory) is compared to experiment
(implies real world outcome).


ROCRIS wrote 4 years ago.
pressure of a static fluid?

Saew wrote 5 years ago.
This is lesson 7, Weight and Weightlessness. Where is the
one about friction?


Saew wrote 5 years ago.
This is lesson 7, Weight and Weightlessness, what happened
to the one about Friction?


amr wrote 5 years ago.
thanks

Carlos Rodriguez wrote 5 years ago.
Hi, I just want to say that this lecture is supposed to be
about friction. It is possible to post the friction lecture?


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Copyright Information:
Walter Lewin, 8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics, Fall 1999. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Physics/8-01Physics-IFall1999/Cour... (Accessed August 07, 2008). License: Creative commons BY-NC-SA
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