Medcast

Video Lectures

Displaying all 24 video lectures.
Lecture 1
Is Evidence-Based Medicine a Barrier to Cost-Effective Care?
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Is Evidence-Based Medicine a Barrier to Cost-Effective Care?
August 29, 2007 presentation by Alan Garber for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Alan Garber, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and the director of the Center for Health Policy and of the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research at Stanford University, discusses the importance of distinguishing between a treatment's effectiveness and its value, and in turn what role evidence-based medicine should play in today's coverage decisions.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 2
Monoclonal Antibodies: Stanford Academia-Industry Collaboration
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Monoclonal Antibodies: Stanford Academia-Industry Collaboration
Ron Levy, MD, professor of Medicine at Stanford, recounts his experiences moving his discovery from the lab to the clinical setting and discusses the future of this cancer treatment. Wendy Harpham, a participant in the early clinical trials of Rituxan, the first FDA-approved monoclonal antibody for cancer treatment that Levy developed, provides a patient's perspective.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 3
The Battle of the Diets: Is Anyone Winning (At Losing?)
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The Battle of the Diets: Is Anyone Winning (At Losing?)
January 17, 2008 presentation by Christopher Gardner for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series. The case for low-carbohydrate diets is gaining weight. Christopher Gardner, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, has completed the largest and longest-ever comparison of four popular diets using real-world conditions, which he discusses - the lowest-carbohydrate Atkins diet came out on top.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 4
The Mismeasure of Man
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The Mismeasure of Man
September 5, 2007 presentation by Ralph Horwitz for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Ralph Horwitz, MD, professor of medicine at Stanford discusses how measurement can both strengthen and weaken clinical science and care. Often overlooked amid today's enthusiasm for quantifiable results, he says, are the real complexities of medicine.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 5
New Perspectives on Menopausal Hormones and Heart Disease
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New Perspectives on Menopausal Hormones and Heart Disease
July 18, 2007 presentation by Marcia Stefanick for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Recent Women's Health Initiative (WHI) studies demonstrated that hormone therapy carries a number of health risks in woman not considered earlier, such as the increased likelihood of blood clots and stroke. Marcia Stefanick, PhD, professor of medicine at Stanford School of Medicine, served as chair of the WHI steering committee and she continues to analyze the project's data for other ill-effects.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 6
From Sickness to Health: Beethoven's Heiliger Dankgesang
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From Sickness to Health: Beethoven's Heiliger Dankgesang
October 30, 2007 presentation by Robert Kapilow for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Backed by Stanford University's Ensemble in Residence, the St. Lawrence String Quartet, Robert Kapilow, composer and radio commentator, explores the notion of illness as a potent source of creativity (e.g., appreciation for existence) through Beethoven's "Heiliger Dankgesang," which Beethoven wrote in thanksgiving after recovering from a life-threatening illness.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 7
Mood Disorders Across Women's Lifecycle
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Mood Disorders Across Women's Lifecycle
November 7, 2007 presentation by Ellie Williams for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Twice as many women as men suffer from depression and mood disorders - but only between puberty and menopause. This burden on women in the reproductive years suggests a powerful link between female hormones and brain function. Ellie Williams, MD, associate director of the Center for Neuroscience in Women's Health, discusses this role of hormones in women's mental health.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 8
Mexican Migrant Health
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Mexican Migrant Health
October 18, 2007 presentation by Enrique Rios Espinosa for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Dr. Enrique Rios Espinosa, Deputy Director for Migrant Health at the Ministry of Health in Mexico, discusses the goal of the program: to protect the health of migrants living in the United States through the design of specific binational strategies of health promotion and provision of culturally sensitive health care; Dr. Espinosa also had a large role in the Mexican Health Care Reform.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 9
Imaging Patients with Myelopathy
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Imaging Patients with Myelopathy
July 6, 2007 presentation by Nancy Fischbein for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Nancy Fischbein, MD, associate professor of neurosurgery, discusses the challenges of assessing spinal cord injury and the latest imaging techniques for diagnosis.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 10
Cancer and Climate Change: Parallels in Risk Management
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Cancer and Climate Change: Parallels in Risk Management
January 29, 2008 presentation by Stephen Schneider for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

When a climate expert gets cancer, the result is unifying theory about how to tackle questions in each field. Stephen Schneider, PhD, professor of biological sciences, discusses his ideas about climate and cancer. He also discusses his 2005 book, The Patient from Hell, which chronicles his attempts to find the best treatment when he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 11
The Influence of Sex/Gender on Cardiovascular Health
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The Influence of Sex/Gender on Cardiovascular Health
January 17, 2008 presentation by Hannah Valentine for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

While more men have heart disease, each year more women die from it--studies have shown that only 8% of women are aware that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women. Hannah Valentine, MD, professor of medicine at Stanford, discusses this and other related discrepancies.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 12
Using Dendritic Cells to Create Cancer Vaccines
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Using Dendritic Cells to Create Cancer Vaccines
November 13, 2007 presentation by Edgar Engleman for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Edgar Engleman, MD, medical director of the Stanford Blood Center, discusses his research involving the use of a special type of white blood cell as a treatment for cancer. Engleman, who is also a professor of pathology at the Stanford School of Medicine, and his team of researchers have been interested in dendritic cells, or DCs, which can provoke an immune response in the body.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 13
Environment Degradation Begets Epidemics: Cholera in Bangladesh
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Environment Degradation Begets Epidemics: Cholera in Bangladesh
November 21, 2007 presentation by Gary Schoolnik for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Gary Schoolnik, MD, professor of medicine, discusses how the use of chemical fertilizers and other environmental disturbances are driving the genetic transformation of cholera in Bangladesh and in turn spawning new epidemics of the disease in South Asia.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 14
Vitamin D: It's Not Just For Bones Anymore
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Vitamin D: It's Not Just For Bones Anymore
December 12, 2007 presentation by David Feldman for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

David Feldman, MD, professor of medicine at Stanford, explores the biological action of Vitamin D beyond its widely understood role in the information and maintenance of bone. Emerging therapeutic uses of the vitamin include the prevention and treatment of breast, prostate and colon cancer, chronic kidney disease and arthritis, among other conditions.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 15
The Politics and Promise of Stem Cell Research
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The Politics and Promise of Stem Cell Research
July 8, 2007 presentation by Irv Weissman for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Irving Weissman, MD, director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, discusses the state of adult and embryonic stem cell research. His work is with adult stem cells, primarily of the blood but also of the brain. He thinks these cells have enormous potential for treating disease such as cancer.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 16
21st Century Bacterial Pneumonia: Old Habits and New Approaches
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21st Century Bacterial Pneumonia: Old Habits and New Approaches
July 25, 2007 presentation by Norman Rizk for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Pneumonia occurs when a person's lungs become inflamed and filled with fluid as a result of infection by bacteria, viruses or fungi. Though treatment protocols have significantly advanced since the Great Pandemic of 1918 -- when mortality rates were 320 times those of today -- pneumonia is still the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. Norman Rizk, MD, professor of medicine, discusses some of the current challenges in diagnosis and treatment, including the issue of drug-resistant bacteria and the prevalence of hospital-acquired pneumonia.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 17
Maternal Infant Care and Challenges in East Africa
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Maternal Infant Care and Challenges in East Africa
December 7, 2007 presentation by Ronald L. Ariagno for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Ronald L. Ariagno, MD, professor of pediatrics at Stanford, speaks about his sabbatical experiences in Kenya and other countries in East Africa; he provides an overview of the most significant factors impacting the health of children in the region.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 18
Rebuilding Iraq's Mental Health Care System
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Rebuilding Iraq's Mental Health Care System
June 29, 2007 presentation by Keith Humphreys for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Stanford, is the lead American addiction expert on the international team tasked with helping Iraq rebuild its mental health system. He discusses the scope of the effort and the challenges the team has faced.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 19
Cancer Biology and Cancer Medicine
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Cancer Biology and Cancer Medicine
April 9, 2008 presentation by Nobel laureate Harold Varmus for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Nobel laureate Harold Varmus discusses the intersection of cancer biology and cancer medicine. Varmus, president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, earned his Nobel Prize for discovering retroviral oncogenes that can cause cancer. That work changed the way people thought about cancer: Rather than being a disease caused by environmental exposure, it could result from mutations in specific genes. Now, much cancer research and the search for therapeutics focus on genetic changes in cancer.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 20
Childhood Obesity and Public Policy
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Childhood Obesity and Public Policy
February 21, 2008 presentation by Lisa Chamberlain, Sophia Yen, and Michelle Oppen for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that the percentage of children who are overweight has more than tripled since 1980. As this epidemic grows, the number of related health disorders in children grows with it. Stanford experts discuss the most critical public health policy changes that are needed.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 21
Four Big Ideas from the Carnegie Study on Medical Education
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Four Big Ideas from the Carnegie Study on Medical Education
April 3, 2008 presentation by Dan Irby for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

David Irby, PhD, a senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, discusses a national effort by the Carnegie Foundation to assess the professional preparation of physicians and offer recommendations for how best to update this framework to meet our emerging healthcare needs.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 22
Changes in Female Sexual Function Throughout the Lifespan
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Changes in Female Sexual Function Throughout the Lifespan
December 12, 2007 presentation Leah Millheiser for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

After a brief review of the history of female sexuality, Leah Millheiser, MD, instructor of obstetrics and gynecology and director of the Female Sexual Medicine Program at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, discusses current research on the impact of various life stages on female sexual function and common causes of female sexual dysfunction and their treatment.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 23
Health Risks of Type-A Behavior
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Health Risks of Type-A Behavior
May 29, 2008 presentation by Wes Alles for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

Wes Alles, PhD, director of the Stanford Health Improvement Program, discusses the health consequences of Type-A behavior. Alles explores a number of strategies for how Type-A behavior can be modified, including strategies for a less stressful lifestyle. The talk is part of a series from Cafe Scientifique, an international network of community meetings for the public on the latest ideas in science and technology.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/
Lecture 24
The New Rotavirus Vaccine: The Second Time is the Charm
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The New Rotavirus Vaccine: The Second Time is the Charm
July 9, 2008 presentation by Harry Greenberg for the Stanford School of Medicine Medcast lecture series.

More than 500,000 infants and children worldwide die each year from severe diarrhea caused by a rotavirus infection. Harry Greenberg, MD, co-director of the Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program, discusses the epidemiology of this virus and the history of developing an effective vaccine.

Stanford University School of Medicine:
http://med.stanford.edu/